Aging Parents: Maintaining Mobility into Old, Old Age–The Dangers of Sitting Too MuchCONTACT SUSAN at: helpagingparents@gmail.com

Sedentary Seniors and Couch-Potato Elders—Walk More. Sit Less

How limiting is life for those with curtailed mobility?

Look around…so many people with canes and walkers as our population ages. Based on the Tufts U. publication–reprinted below–it seems their numbers would lessen if the elderly couch potatoes we care about (as well as those of us who now spend hours sitting at a desk), make it a point to take breaks for a brief walk. What could be easier?

The importance of older peoples’ walking is nothing new to longtime readers of my blog.  “If you begin a daily walking program at age 45, you could delay immobility to 90 and beyond. If you become a couch potato at 45 and remain so, immobility can encroach as early as 60.” So says Mark Lachs, author of Treat Me, Not My Age.   (Dr. Lachs is Chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at Weill Medical College in NY among other positions, and first written about in my 2010  post featuring Jane Brody’s NY Times columnWhat to Do Now to Feel Better at 100.) 

Sr. Advisor R, was living proof. She didn’t use a cane (didn’t own one as far as I know) until she was 97–after her broken hip episode. instead R walked daily on a treadmill from age 50 (as written previously–not the plug in kind, your feet make it go). And R continued using that treadmill daily–until she died.

(R’s best friend [93] is the beneficiary of that treadmill and phoned last week, laughingly saying she knew it was bequeathed to her and she’d send a strong young relative over to pick it up if that was OK.)

Further proof was my dad, who was 94 before I ever saw him use a cane….and then he used Mom’s old cane, which probably wasn’t the right fit; but he said he only used it when he felt weak. Out of respect, I never pushed him on the subject. (His mind was good.) That said, he not only walked a lot, he had to walk upstairs to his bedroom and down the basement stairs to get into his car. Thus, many leg muscles were exercised daily and mobility was never an issue other than that he walked slower than in his younger days.

A well-respected chiropractor in Westchester County, NY told me that he could always tell which patients wintered in Florida because they didn’t get the exercise walking stairs provided. Enough said. Here’s the latest  on “sedentary sitters”–

Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter

August 24, 2015

Brief Walks May Counter Health Dangers of Too Much Sitting

Multiple studies have warned about the health risks of sitting too much. Hours spent sitting, whether at desks or in front of the television, have been linked to increased odds of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and kidney problems. But modern life can make it difficult to stay out of chairs, and alternatives such as “standing desks” don’t appeal to everyone.

A new study may offer hope to sedentary sitters: Using data on more than 3,600 adults, researchers found that brief periods of simply walking around the room substantially reduced mortality risk among people who spent long periods sitting. As little as two minutes of gentle walking per hour was associated with a 33% lower risk compared to non-stop sitting.

“We know that exercise is good for us and yet, despite this, our society has become more sedentary than ever,” says Miriam E. Nelson, PhD, associate dean of the Tisch College and a professor in Tufts’ Friedman School, author of the “Strong Women” series of books. “We are built to move, and when our bodies move on a regular basis, they are healthy; when they don’t, when we’re largely sedentary, our bodies deteriorate.”

MEASURING MOVEMENT: In the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Srinivasan Beddhu, MD, of the University of Utah, and colleagues analyzed data from the annual National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In recent surveys, selected participants have supplemented their questionnaire answers by wearing activity monitors called accelerometers; this gives a more accurate record of a person’s movements than depending on individual recall. Most of the participants were generally healthy, although a subgroup of 383 people had chronic kidney disease.

Researchers divided participants into four groups based on minutes per hour of different levels of accelerometer activity: sedentary/sitting, low (such as standing up but not walking around much), light (such as strolling around a room or walking into another room), and moderate/vigorous (jogging or other exercise). The study then compared activity levels to records of deaths three or four years after the assessment.

ADDITIVE ACTIVITY: There was little difference in mortality between the sedentary and low-activity groups. But people who interrupted their sitting with light activity were at significantly lower mortality risk than those who were completely sedentary; this difference was even sharper among the kidney-disease subgroup (41%). As little as two minutes an hour of light activity was enough to be associated with lower risk.

Boosting activity levels to moderate/vigorous further reduced risk, but the number of such active participants was too low to be statistically significant. Adding additional minutes of light activity, however, did make a significant difference. Getting up from your chair for two minutes or five minutes more light activity rather than sitting time, Dr. Beddhu said, could further reduce risk of premature death.

He cautioned that the study was observational, and so can’t prove cause and effect. And Tufts’ Nelson notes that a quick walking break from your chair is no substitute for regular physical activity. But if you’ve been worried about the health risks of sitting too much, apparently every little bit helps.”

Last January (2015) Time magazine’s online article discusses the sitting dangers and recommends “standing up and moving around every half hour

Check out “Newsworthy” (right sidebar). Links to timely tips, information and research from top universities and respected professionals–to help parents age well.

Related: Helpful information from his book in ABC 2010 interview with Dr. Lachs.
Jane Brody’s NY Times columnWhat to Do Now to Feel Better at 100
Time Magazine online, 2/
2015 . It Doesn’t Matter How Much You Exercise if You Also Do This
USA Today 2/2014. Don’t just sit there! It could be harmful in later life.

Aging Independently and Well Over Decades–10 How-to’s

“As we live our lives, we write our own destiny” Sr. Advisor R 

Sr. Advisor R,, my mil, was a poster child for aging independently, unselfishly and well. She said, to the extent she could, she’d done everything; helped everyone; and given to those she wanted to give. She was ready to go. It was no secret. And I’ve been thinking–since her timely death last week at 101–about how she managed life so well.

R lived by the following:   

 1.Take care of yourself (or you won’t be able to take care of anything else).
2. Be responsible
3. Don’t abuse yourself. (You get enough from the outside)
4. Know when to say “no.”
5. Simplify (as you age)
6. Don’t assume (you can be wrong; it causes unnecessary problems)
7. Don’t expect anything and you won’t be disappointed
8. Concentrate. (If your hands are doing one thing while your head is thinking another, you forget where you put things.)
9. Remember life is good–it’s the people who mess it up.
10.To bring joy in today’s world there are three things you can count on: animals, flowers, music.

Elaboration

1.  The African proverb “It Takes a Village to Raise a Child” resonates loudest. It may sound like an oxymoron. R was clearly not a child and independence was her highest priority. Making it easier for other family members was a necessity in childhood and became part of her being. She was smart–smart enough to know she couldn’t help others without taking care of herself first. At a very young age she was part of the village. Later the village gave back.

2.  “You’ve got to be responsible,” R vividly remembers her father saying when she was 4. It had a huge impact and she acted accordingly.  She recalled their quarantined home during an epidemic, an older sister’s death, another sibling’s health issues, the Great Depression, WWII, being a caregiver for close family and friends. Everyone knew R was 100% responsable. It was who she was.

3.  R’s home was the buffer for any outside abuse. She made it tranquil, lovely and loved–a place to gain strength and renewal. Widowed at 50, she didn’t indulge in activities that would be bad for her. This doesn’t mean she didn’t overdo in certain areas, but she had the discipline to know when she’d overdone and compensated as appropriate. She treated herself to things that brought joy or made life easier. Her easy-care plants symbolized life and joy thus, she replaced and watered them as needed until the week she died–not easy at 101.

4.  R taught us early there was nothing wrong with saying “no” and “I don’t know.” Simply  because someone asks, doesn’t mean we are obligated give the answer we think they want. (This doesn’t make us selfish. It makes us real–my opinion…and we can be very nice while being real.)

5.  Normal age-related changes slow us down. Simplifying allows us to continue life as we’ve known/enjoyed it. Examples:
–R’s many house plants decreased in number and care requirements as she aged. She gave many away and concentrated on the easy-care ones.
–While she went out every day in her younger years, she reduced to only one activity a day, then going out every other day. The last few months she only went out for doctors’ appointments.
–Still making her own meals, R realized she could save dish-washing by putting Trader Joe’s chopped salad greens along with salad dressing in a zip-lock bag, giving it a good shake, and spilling it out onto the plate with her dinner.

6.  Don’t assume. See #6 above. This is so true. Test it!

7.  Don’t expect. See #8 above. Seems jaded, but saves disappointment.

8.  How many times have we forgotten where we put something because our hand did one thing while our mind was on something else? We weren’t concentrating. Shortly after R was widowed she lost something important. She couldn’t remember where she put it. Without anyone to ask for help, R promised herself, from then on, she would never again lose things due to lack of concentration.

9 and 10 above: Life, animals, flowers and music–thoughts R kept front and center as she encountered the challenges of living.

In recent years R acknowledged that she did everything she felt important to do; helped everyone she’d wanted to help, and given what she could to specific charities that served a larger need-base of people and pets. She had significantly contributed to the village.

Since R’s only-child son and I live 2,000 miles away, the village–basically two wonderful neighboring women, Pam and Barb, and a nephew and his wife–made it possible, on a daily basis, for R to continue to live in her own home–with only a cleaning woman working half a day and a gardener. What better “assisted living” could anyone ask for! R had unfailingly done for them over the years and they could never do enough. R was a giver; never wanted to be a taker. In the end, what comes around, goes around.

Check out “Newsworthy” (right sidebar). Links to timely tips, information and research from top universities and respected professionals–to help parents age well.

Tailoring the Holidays for Elders’ Needs

Some aging parents are lifted by the excitement and activities of Christmas; for others there’s overstimulation and stress. And at some point, for all aging parents, there’s a slowing down. Do we notice this? Can/should we do something?

Indeed, the holidays can be tricky for some and need to be simplified for two groups: aging parents/elders and those with Alzheimer’s. (See Related below for latter.)

There comes a time when aging parents and elders we care about can’t do what they used to because of aging-related conditions. I ran the preceding sentence by our Sr. Advisor, Dr. Bud, MD, (psychiatrist) asking for his thoughts.

‘”The consequence of aging is difficult to process. You (older people) feel weakness, frustration–less and less in charge. Your expectations of yourself to perform at a certain level leave doubts.” For example: “It can be a struggle to articulate thoughts and responses, causing frustration and fatigue from trying.” …And hearing–“You keep hearing loss hidden because it’s embarrassing. A joke is told, you miss the point because you don’t hear; yet everyone’s laughing so you laugh to hide your (hearing) deficiency. it’s embarrassing to expose weaknesses in oneself.”

As I listened I gained new insight–realizing why some elders I’ve known, who appear to function well one-to-one, begin to drop out of the “social scene.” It seems to come down to at least 3 age-related conditions:

1. Less tolerance for confusion
2.  Changes in energy level
3.  Pride

Knowing this, we can offer the support and do some of the “tailoring” so the holiday festivities provide less stress and more fun as parents age.

Confusion: Too much going on can be confusing. Think: holiday events–too many people to remember, too many conversations to pay attention to; too much energy in the room; too much noise–makes listening difficult. The solution: Encourage small festive gatherings of friends and family. They work best.

Dad enjoyed people, regardless of number. He held a high position in the Hospitality Industry and loved speaking at large conventions (introduced Ronald Reagan at one). Yet, in his later years, he slowed down–preferring fewer people, more easily-heard conversation. On short notice he (in his early 90’s) let us invite his friends for New Year’s Day 6 months after Mom died. We were visiting, made the suggestion, and offered to make the calls and bring in the food. Around twelve elders (88-90+) arrived that afternoon–ate, talked, laughed, watched TV. Our effort was minimal (Trader Joe’s everything) but their enjoyment was great. An easy way to lift spirits at the start of a new year on a small scale.

Similarly Sr. Advisor, R, remarkable at 97, had an unusual amount of energy for her age–even after her recovery from broken hip surgery. At 99 she was rationing her energy–declining invitations to go out two days in a row and avoiding large holiday parties. Shortly after her 100th birthday party, at her insistence a smallish affair–just family– she lost the “oomph.” Doctors say her health at 101 is “excellent for her age,” yet she uses lack of energy as her reason for staying home. She controls– has tailored the holidays as a time of giving to others. She no longer wants the festivities.

Energy: Older people’s energy declines. “Energy is always a problem,” according to Sr. Advisor D, now 89. She says sometimes it’s necessary to “pick and choose” what you’re going to do and it’s often dictated by the energy involved.

For example, this year she didn’t attend her family’s Thanksgiving dinner, an hour’s drive away. A family member could easily take her and bring her back. Just recovering from a bout of something, she said she didn’t have the energy to make the effort.

Do we realize it takes energy to have conversations? The need to quickly remember things and people can cause stress. It also takes energy to dress especially nicely to go out. It takes additional energy if a long drive is involved.

No-longer-driving elders are dependent on someone for transportation, which creates an additional obstacle: if they  want to go home early for any reason, they don’t want to impose on their driver, according to Sr. Advisor, D.

One solution: Someone (their friend?) drives elders to the event. They can call you on their cell phone if they want/need to come home early. We’re not talking about an every-night responsibility. Most likely an available family member can handle that responsibility during the holidays. ls this payback time? Isn’t this what parents did for us, should we have needed to leave a party early when we were teenagers? Of course, they may decide to stay and go back with the person who brought them.

Pride: Older people may not want friends and/or former colleagues to see any lessening of themselves.

One 90-year-old with advanced macular degeneration, for example, declined all invitations to large social activities, rather than risk the embarrassment of misidentifying or not recognizing people she knew.

While we can’t tailor large parties, there’s a solution so those with low vision can feel comfortable going. Several older people with macular degeneration go to parties with an early detection device– a good friend or family member who stays with them and discretely whispers in advance “Here comes Sally.” Can we be an early detection device for low-vision elders?

If this works for the President, who has people standing behind him quickly whispering the name and position of the person coming up to greet him at events, why not use this “crutch” for aging parents who have low vision and even those with bad memories?

After all, connections with others help older people age well. Isn’t that our goal?

Check out “Newsworthy” (right sidebar). Links to timely information and research from top universities and respected professionals, plus practical information–to help parents age well.


Related: 
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s blog. Especially read comments.
                For Elders Who No Longer Drive at Night: Suggestions for enjoying the Christmas lights

Aging Dads: Incontinence Issues–Part 1 Older Men

incontinence-condition

Wanting to be inclusive, this follows last Saturday’s post about women’s incontinence and the New Guidelines for dealing with it. Interestingly, a current TV ad features a group of women mapping out where bathrooms are located, before presumably going out shopping–or for lunch. Then of course we hear about the product that will make that kind of planning unnecessary.

But what about men?

Although the high rise of incontinence is in women 75 and over, and the rise is less dramatic in men, incontinence–usually temporary (3-6 months)–is common following prostate surgery. Also as men age the sphincter muscle that controls urine outflow can weaken due to more and more years of use. Doctors recommend Kegel exercises for men (with varying degrees of success depending on different factors). I’ve selected informational links from what I consider reputable sources like Mayo Clinic, as this post is intended to provide some background information before speaking with a doctor if there are issues. It should not be construed as giving medical advice, however.

Links:
—Mayo Clinic has instructions for doing Kegel exercises: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/mens-health/in-depth/kegel-exercises-for-men/art-20045074
—Webmd weighs in: http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/kegel-exercises-treating-male-urinary-incontinence
—The NY Times blog also (July 2014)–Here it’s necessary to read to the end of the article to avoid missing important information: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/14/ pelvic-exercises-for-men-too/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

As we get older and dine out with friends, it’s not unusual to have men get up from the table to use the bathroom. It’s a part of aging. Enlarged prostate as well as prostate cancer become problematic for many older men. That’s why PSA monitoring is important– may be the equivalent of mammograms for women.

Everyone of a certain age (boomers and older) must know men who have had surgery for prostate cancer. Whether using the DaVinci method or the traditional method, there will be some degree of incontinence for a limited time. An acquaintance is living with the same incontinence situation (following successful prostate surgery for cancer) as the person in Harvard’s Health publication–Prostate Knowledge. He is currently debating the surgery, as was the man in this very good article http://www.harvardprostateknowledge.org/a-patients-story-overcoming-incontinence#an important read for any man contemplating prostate surgery or dealing with incontinence.

Included–as always–in the current US News‘ 2014-2015 survey are the best urology departments in the US. The top 4 (all scoring at least 91.2 to /100) are: Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic-Rochester, Johns Hopkins and UCLA Medical Center respectively. This does not mean they have the best urologists for men’s incontinence; but it does mean these hospitals have excellent departments, if needed. Click for the list

We try to help parents age well. While incontinence is bothersome and embarrassing and isn’t usually an ordinary topic of conversation, understandings about it may prove helpful for many.

Related: Johns Hopkins yearly “Prostate Cancer “Discovery” 2015 issue, plus site with yearly back issues.

Note: “Newsworthy” (right sidebar). Links to timely information from outstanding research institutions–and some fun stuff–to help parents age well.

 

Slowed-down Aging Parents–What I never realized

https://i1.wp.com/www.cinemit.com/images/aliceinwonderlandwide.jpg

“I’m late, I’m late……..”*

TIME MATTERS–POKEY PARENTS
(Joints stiffen. Less agility. More wisdom. More Caution.
Does slowing down begin earlier than we realize?)

While I don’t remember the time (it was decades ago), I do remember the place: inside a New York taxi. I found a credit card on the floor and tried to decide whether to leave it with the driver or take it home and try to locate the owner.

The next time I took a taxi, after paying and before getting out, I took a few seconds to look at the back seat and floor to be certain I hadn’t left anything. Taking precautions.

How does this relate to aging parents slowing down?

I’d never before thought of accidentally leaving something in a taxi. But from the moment I realized the possibility, double-checking before exiting became normal for me. It  took a bit longer getting out of a taxi from then on.

I’m guessing we’ve all experienced moments similar to this– that caused us to adjust our actions so we continued to do what we previously did–only not as quickly.  As we get older our experiences multiply, generating wisdom and opening our eyes to potential problems we’d never thought about (eg. the necessity to double-check).  Then add age-related problems and dwindling energy.  Understandably people slow down. For fast-forward adult children (who may not realize this is happening to them too), pokey parents can frustrate and annoy.

Last month I had lunch with a friend (and former colleague) on her 92nd birthday. For at least two decades we’d celebrated with a birthday lunch that included one of her college friends (now 90). Both women were educators. That’s how I knew them.

Very bright and able (one was recruited for the Manhattan project), they attended the same college, one of the “Seven Sisters.” People would say they have aged well, yet they clearly have aging issues. During lunch, while we discussed politics (often an ongoing discussion in NY), and the accomplishments of their children and grandchildren, and caught up on what others are doing, the theme of “time” was always in the mix–whether explicit or implicit.

The women (with varying degrees of macular degeneration) and now widowed, discussed how long it took them to do things now, as compared to their younger, working years. They were well-aware they have slowed down. The one with better vision continues to drive to a responsible supervisory position but only two half-days a week now; the one with greatly impaired vision taught college math into her early 80’s. Currently she has a daytime companion to drive her and help keep her home in order.

They talked about how much time it takes just to get ready to go out in the morning. Interestingly things we take for granted, like the physical act of dressing, slows older people down.

Think about stiff joints and arthritis…and vision. Then think about buttons, zippers, or–for women–the clasp on a necklace or fastening a bra (which some do from the front before turning it around to the back), or the physical act of slipping something over one’s head.  How much additional time does it take to differentiate dark blue from black? (Try sorting those socks.) Have you ever seen an older man wearing one black sock and one dark blue sock?

There’s age-related slowing down (vision, hearing, muscle loss, stiff joints) plus, Sr. Advisor D noted, psychological slowing down that comes from caution and concerns. She stressed a prevailing fear of falling (and breaking a bone, a hip) among the old, old-old, and oldest old.

There’s also “a persistent worry about forgetting,” she said, “so there’s added urgency– the feeling they must take care of a thing right away before it’s forgotten.” This causes older people to double-check themselves to make certain they did–or will do– it right. And they don’t multi-task well because they realize multi-tasking diverts concentration and can easily lead to forgetting.  Concentrating on one thing at a time is a good strategy, but takes more time.

We may become frustrated and impatient when aging parents seem so pokey. Assuming they have a perfectly good mind, we can easily become intolerant when they’re keeping us waiting while they finish getting ready for something important like a doctor’s appointment.

Should we leave some wiggle room (tell a little lie) when giving aging parents a time they need to be ready? It can’t hurt. We only need to remember to be diplomatic when we ask them to write it down on their calendar or put it in their smart phone. Otherwise, if they’re late, we are partially at fault, aren’t we.

 

* Smidge of original dialog from Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland

 

 

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Aging–Macular Degeneration: A Determined 100-year-old’s Efforts to Maintain Quality of Life

R's 100th Birthday

                                                               R’s 100th Birthday

Sr. Advisor R has been called “amazing” for years by so many 40-60-year-olds, who also call her “terrific” and “timeless.” Past posts have underscored their respect for her wisdom and admiration for her ways of handling things. She’s both an advisor to this bog, and my m-i-l. And currently she is facing another challenge: a big round spot blocking vision in one eye–macular degeneration.

During 100 years of living she has overcome much–the last big hurdle: her impressive recovery from a broken hip (femur) at 97. That was three years ago. Her mind remains excellent for her age and she was aware her sight was suffering “a little” degeneration, but was getting no professional treatment and hadn’t noticed that her sight was changing until it suddenly began over several days.

Coincidently she had an opthalmologist appointment scheduled a few days later. While she began immediate treatment, the prognosis from two ophthalmologists is that results will be slow and no doubt limited. With her vision impacted and depth perception a real problem she is making adjustments.

“We take eyesight for granted–don’t realize how important it is–it’s your connection to the world,” says R, who adds “I’ll do the best I can with it.” With one “weak but useable” eye, she is using two magnifying glasses of different magnifications to finish doing her income taxes (making itemized lists) for the accountant next week. Everything takes much more time now, and planning how long something will take is “ify,” especially getting ready to go some place.

R acknowledges that when facing serious challenges in the past, she had to let go of some things and prioritize others in order to redirect her energy towards maintaining independence. This is the last year she will do her taxes. Which brings us to yesterday.

R continues with her life, albeit at a slower pace because vision problems affect simple things like putting on make-up and doing her hair. Yesterday she needed to go to the bank.  My husband or I could have done that errand for her but she didn’t want to give in to that.

She requested I pick her up more than an hour later than the usual time. The young woman who usually helps at the bank, J, was away when we arrived. She later heard R was there and appeared as R was finishing her business. “I haven’t seen you in months and I was worried,” was J’s greeting. Then ensued a conversation about R’s eye situation and being 100 and how much she admires R.

J then told what I believe to be a true story about a friend’s grandfather. We seem to like to talk about amazing older people who still make the effort.  At age 103, he still works out at the gym 4 days a week. Evidently one of the trainers told him that perhaps he should cut down the number of workouts–or at least shorten them. To which the grandfather asked: “How old are you?” Response: “30 something.” “I’m 103,” said the grandfather.

Whereupon a thought entered my mind: When older people are doing great and still have a good mind, why do younger people feel a need to give them advice? I know R doesn’t believe in what she calls “unsolicited advice.”

We hear more and more about people living into old, old age. No doubt all have some aging problems. The ones who “soldier through,” who make the effort, are the amazing ones. They have been called “The Greatest Generation.” I wonder if we will do as well.

R has often said “I’m a realist.” Yet I’ve never heard her say anything like “Growing old is not for sissies.” Instead she will be the first to tell you getting old “isn’t easy,” explaining “it takes willpower, energy, and common sense–more every year.” She has been widowed half of her life, thinks deeply and shares knowledge of a lifetime when appropriate. Her younger friends say she has taught them so much about living. It has cemented a special bond.

“They care about me and I care about them too,” she says.

If that doesn’t provide the bedrock for quality of life and a reason for making the effort, I don’t know what does.

Related:
In sidebar– 12/11/13 Mayo Clinic’s Age-Related Vision Problems and How the Eye Perceives Them

3/26/14 Help! Aging Parents has been nominated for 2014 “Best Blogs by Individuals” recognition and we would appreciate your vote by 4/28 if you’re on Facebook. We were honored to be judged part of a 3-way tie for first runner-up last year thanks to your votes which took us to the judging round. Click top badge at right to view a universe of helpful aging blogs and resources, even if you can’t vote on Facebook.

Changing often: “Of Current Interest” (right sidebar). Timely links to research and information from top universities, plus some fun stuff to help parents age well.

 

Aging Parents and Us: Must Age, Health Decline, and Dependency go Hand in Hand?

 Growing Older Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Growing Old

We may question this assumption if we’re in the midst of caring for aging parents with health issues. On the other hand, the results of research, published last month in the Journals of Gerontology, may be heartening for us if our parents are still relatively healthy and independent–and also heartening as we think about our years ahead. It’s written by Dana Goldman, a most distinguished professor at USC, who is an adjunct professor at UCLA as well.

In short: after analyzing extensive survey data of Americans aged 51+, researchers  from U. of Illinois at Chicago, Stanford, and the University of Southern California, “found that a substantial group of individuals at all ages experienced not just exceptional health, but their mental and physical functioning was at a level exhibited by people decades younger.” (The MacArthur Foundation, a longtime a leader in aging research  and the  National Institute on Aging funded the study.)   Isn’t that good news!

Dr. Goldman’s article is an easy, quick read (less than 2 minutes) with interesting details. Sometimes, when we feel burdened, hearing something positive, based on  facts, is just “what the doctor ordered.”

And if you need/want more of “what the doctor ordered,” watch/listen to the interview link below, courtesy of the 12/2/13 Huffington Post, for a futuristic way of delivering medical information and services.

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If we’re currently dealing with parents’ health issues, and frustrated with the communication problems that often arise, this interview from the 12/2/13   Huffington Post, with Dr./billionaire Patrick-Soon-Shiong is a must-watch. I believe cancer was an initial motivating factor in his work, but everyone who has health issues will benefit.

Using the cloud, genome data, a specially designed super-computer, and more, he has created an infrastructure for a new medical delivery system that includes a “fluid medical information highway.” This could soon bode well for everyone’s health care, regardless of age. (FYI– Pancreatic cancer patients have been free of the disease for 5 years using these futuristic technologies.)

*         *        *
The Thanksgiving holiday provided me time to catch up on some reading and  learn a bit about telomeres and aging from my husband’s cousin (a highly respected researcher at one of the two top institutes of technology in the US). It also caused me to post this a day late.  (Returned to NY last night.) A post about telomeres will appear once I’ve had it vetted for accuracy.

Research clearly provides us with interesting, exciting and hopefully personally helpful information, as we continue to meet the challenges of helping parents age well.

Changing weekly: “Of Current Interest”(right sidebar). Links to timely information and research from top universities, plus some free and some fun stuff–to help parents age well.