HELP! AGING PARENTS–REALLY HELP!!

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MY HEADING AND SIDEBAR DISAPPEARED FROM THEIR ASSIGNED PLACES!

I found the header in my image file and got it this far. But my priority, before I realized something happened to my blog, was to remember our Veterans on this Veteran’s Day, November 11, 20013.

While searching to find my sidebar and its information, and wondering if my technical expertise would allow me to get the header back in place, I stop, catch my breath, and think about what our veterans–past and present–have endured and the sacrifices they have made to protect our freedom.  This newly-weird blog layout is a gnat’s eyelash in the scheme of things, when compared the importance of this day.  So I’m focusing on what’s most important right now–celebrating and commemorating those brave individuals, many of whom are aging parents and grandparents.

WWII vets help unveil Medal of Honor postage stamp   In addition to the parades taking place throughout the country, the Medal of Honor postage stamp is issued today. Click above link. Today’s NY Times, had the obituary of one WWII Medal of

George Sakato, a Medal of Honor recipient from World War II, gestures at his portrait after helping unveil a new postage stamp dedicated to MOH recipients from WWII on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2013 in Washington, D.C. The U.S. Postal Service issued the stamp in honor of the last 12 living medal recipients from the war, although only eight were living at the time of the ceremony.
C.J. Lin/Stars and Stripes

Honor recipient, John Hawk, 89, of Bremerton, WA. He died a week ago, November 4th. WWII Medal of Honor recipient, George Sakato of Denver CO., 92, is alive and speaks on the preceding video link.  Francis Currey, 88, living near Albany, NY is a 3rd Medal of Honor Recipient on the stamp, for valor in the Battle of the Bulge. New York City’s 94th annual parade was broadcast world-wide. Thousand of New Yorkers lined the streets and held signs that said “Thank You.”

I found George Sakato’s words compelling–testimony to the emotional impact and scars, so many decades later. They don’t go away.

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